Category Archives: life

Hanging with j5

Festival day 2. The proximity to people ALL the time is a bit wearing for an introvert. But we’ve seen some great bands, topped off tonight by Jurassic 5. They hung around the stage after and daughter got her hat sighed & photo taken. She was v happy so good dad points were earned,

The one eyed man

(this photo is from last Sunday, but posting it with this date)

Last Sunday I woke up with a painful eye. It got worse and by Sunday morning I was in agony. I went to A&E, something I haven’t done since I was about 13. It turned out I had a corneal abrasion. The nurse took this photo with my phone. See that green blob by my pupil? That’s a big scratch. A week before something had flicked up in my eye, and after a ¬†day’s blurry vision, this had cleared up. But it had weakened the protective layer (the doctor reckoned), so when I rubbed it during the night I was just gouging the cornea like a massive idiot.
They said it should clear up in 48 hours but on Tuesday (when I should have been running a university wide workshop), it was worse, so I went back to A&E, and then got referred to the eye clinic. Here, like something out of A Clockwork Orange, they put a contact lens bandage on it to protect it, and told me to come back again in two days.
During this time I was a) whimpering quite a lot, b) unable to look at a ¬†screen and c) listening to a lot of Radio 4. It seems to be healing up now, after another visit, but it’s still blurry.
This means I have broken my long run of daily blips. And having done so, I’m not sure I want to carry on recording every day of my life, so I may be using Blip less now. See what happens when you rub your eye?

Behold

I got a new wardrobe for my daughter’s room. It was basically a battle between us, only one could be victorious. There were tears, there were curse words, there was violence. But I emerged the victor. Just don’t open the doors

Steep bank

Went to see my dad in hospital today. He’d had a 7 hour operation with a team of 5 surgeons, anaesthetists, etc around him, and was now in intensive care, but was looking very well and was quite jolly. We mused on how much this would cost. You know that the NHS is a good thing but most of the time you don’t have much to do with it. When you do, you are forcefully reminded how great it is – all the staff were friendly, helpful and professional, the hospital ward was clean and modern. That anyone should want to mess with it should be a criminal act. Which is my analogy with this sign – this meddling is a steep bank, it quickly leads to danger.